Train Seesaw


A motorized "Brio type" train climbs this seesaw--and its weight flips it down the other side. The track (actually it's a channel) is 3D printed and can be customized as to angle, radius, length and color.

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:65965



Step 1:

Train Seesaw
Start by printing track. I left holes to screw the track to plywood.

Step 2:

Train Seesaw
The turning pieces (30 degrees each--3 of them make a 90 degree turn) are cut off from the straight piece (using Autodesk 123D--free).

The diameter of a complete circle is 12.5 inches. Make the top longer, but use the 15 degree cuts at each end, and you will achieve a larger radius. Change the angle if you want something completely different.

Step 3:

Train Seesaw
Train Seesaw
You can clip the pieces together using a printed clip (I only designed the corner clip--corner to straight and straight to straight will be longer clips).

Because the seesaw must be held firmly in place (and the approach pieces also), I used 1/2 inch #4 woodscrews.

Step 4:

Train Seesaw
Train Seesaw
Two straight pieces of track are held together using the pivot piece. The pivot piece is not centered--so that the track will tend to rest in one direction.

Step 5:

Train Seesaw
Press the 3/8 inch (ID) bearings in the support pieces (vxb.com for bearings).

Step 6:

Train Seesaw
Train Seesaw
Cut a 3/8 inch diameter wood rod (72mm long) and press it into one bearing, through the pivot piece and into the other bearing.

Step 7:

Train Seesaw
To make the seesaw reliably land on one end, I glued a chunk of surplus plastic (a bad print) under the right side.

Step 8:

Train Seesaw
Set up your layout and let the train go!
 
 

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