Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock

Numitrons are neat display devices similar to nixie tubes but designed for much lower voltages. Numitrons are basically incandescent displays in which filaments create the segments.

They have a retro look that i liked so much. I bought 6x IV-9 russian numitrons in ebay, they were about 3$ each, they're pretty cheap!
At that time i didn't know what to do with them, but then i thought about a clock. Using software from a single LED display clock i made this impressive numitron clock.

Step 1: Program the PIC

Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock

The original purpose of the software was to drive a single common-anode LED display rather than a numitron, but either way works.
The software was modified to flash the digits so the HHMM LEDs wouldn't be necessary. Also the software was modified so if the tens of hours is 0 then it is not displayed.
Moreover, the software does not check the input values so entering the wrong time such as 67:85 would be accepted, but eventually the clock will start resetting the digits correctly.

The clock operates off a PIC 16F84A using a program written by David Tait (software is further down this page). The crystal oscillator for the clock is a 4MHz crystal.

I think another microcontroller such as PIC16F628A could also work fine.

Single digit numitron clock
numitron.hex6 KB
Single digit numitron clock
clock.asm9 KB

Step 2: The circuit

Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock
After testing on the breadboard, the clock works fine, with the current crystal the clock comes forward a minute each 3 days, with a precision one it can be solved, but it's good enough for me; because setting time is easy.
You can see the test video below and download the eagle schematic to modify it.

Since numitron displays are just complex bulbs, it could be a problem to drive them from the processor, but in this case, it's not a problem:
The PIC16F84A can source or sink 25mA per I/O pin.

But each port has a limit:

Maximum current sunk by PORTA-80 mA
Maximum current sourced by PORTA-50 mA

Maximum current sunk by PORTB-150 mA
Maximum current sourced by PORTB-100 mA

With IV-9/IV-16 each segment draws 20mA, but be careful if you choose another numitron!
Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock - Step #2(516x290) 29 KB
Single digit numitron clock
numitron w.sch463 KB
Single digit numitron clock
pinomelean.lbr20 KB

Step 3: PCB design

Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock
The board measures about 4x3cm (1.6x1.2inches).
it could be way smaller with all components in smd version and onto a double-layer board; but the design i made is the easier/cheaper one.

The board i made the clock with was later modified and optimized.
I used 4 resistors for the HHMM LEDs when a common resistor would do the trick.
I also used a header jumper to switch on or off the numitron, but it turned out that the microcontroller sank the current through ''off'' pins, dimly lighting up some segments.

You can use the PDF to make the circuit with the toner transfer method (see http://www.instructables.com/id/PCB-making-guide/)
Or order it with the .BRD file.
Single digit numitron clock
numitron w.brd87 KB
Single digit numitron clock
numitron w.pdf15 KB

Step 4: Populating the PCB

Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock
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After drilling the holes and tinning the pads, it's time to populate The PCB.

You'll need the following components:
-PIC16F84A microcontroller (or compatible)
-18 pin DIL socket
-IV-9 or IV-16 numitron (or one of your choice, but check pinout!)
-4 LEDs (just check if they fit)
-4MHz crystal
-2x 470ohm 1206 SMD resistors
-1x 1K5 1206 SMD resistor
-2x male header, or the power input you want
-An SMD capacitor, just for filtering, no matter the value.

First solder the wire jumpers and the SMD components, then the rest. Do it as shown in the diagram (the .BRD file)
Solder just the socket without the PIC in!

If you're using IV-9 or IV-16 numitron, bend the leads as shown in the picture. If you use another numitron, see the datacheet and check if it is pin-compatible, if not, you can edit the PCB or bed the leads as needed.

Step 5: Ready to use

Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock
Single digit numitron clock
After plugging it, it should display 12:00, set the time by pressing the button when the digit you want to change is being displayed.
If you press the button during power on, it will enter in test mode.

I can't wait to see how you've done.
If you have any problem or doubt, feel free t ask me.

If you've liked this instructable, please vote me for the Supercharged, 123D Circuits and Spring's Coming contests.
 
 

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